London Marathon: Empowering Charities One Step at a time

The London Marathon is not only one of the world's most iconic road races, but it also serves as a significant fundraising event for charities, with participants raising millions of pounds each year for various causes.
Tags: The bears, Blog, Charity Fundraising

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The London Marathon is one of the world’s most iconic road races. It serves as a significant fundraising event for charities, with participants raising millions of pounds each year for various causes.

Hey, my name’s Richard, and I am not a runner.

You might be surprised to read that, considering this is a blog about me attempting to run the London Marathon. Yet here I am, writing about my attempt to run the London Marathon and the crucial role this event plays in supporting charities.

You might be surprised to read that, considering this is a blog about me attempting to run the London Marathon. Yet here I am, writing about my attempt to run the London Marathon and the crucial role this event plays in supporting charities.

Yes, okay, I’ve spent the best part of 20 years running around aimlessly on a rugby field. Chasing down 18 stone men and, on the odd occasion, crossing over the tryline. To put it frankly, I am not a runner. Certainly not of the kind required to conquer the 26.2 miles of the London Marathon, at least, until now…

In January I decided to commit my time to train and participate in the event to support Leonard Cheshire, a fantastic charity that helps people with disabilities live independently.

Training for the marathon in the British winter has been a journey of discovery, from long Sunday morning runs to sticking to a rigorous training plan. It all comes down to my final long run, the marathon itself.

If you would like to donate to my Just Giving page, please click the link below

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running for charities

So why did I decide to run the London marathon?

The honest answer is, I’m not quite sure. Supporting a charity like Leonard Cheshire was the underlining motivating factor. I’ll also be joining 50,000 fellow runners who have gone through a similar journey over the past few months, all in aid of raising much-needed funds for charities.

The London marathon – 26.2 miles in 26 words

The London Marathon is the best in the world because of its iconic course, massive spectator support, and tremendous charitable fundraising that positively impacts millions worldwide.

Why is the London Marathon the best marathon in the world?

Renowned worldwide as one of the best marathons for both participants and spectators. It boasts the best atmosphere and iconic landmarks like Tower Bridge, London Eye, and Buckingham Palace. Spectators create an electric atmosphere for runners, lining the streets in their thousands, cheering them on with music, banners, and costumes.

So why is the London Marathon so important to charities?

Charities have been an integral part of the iconic event since its inception in 1981. The event is the largest annual fundraising event in the world, providing a significant opportunity for charities to raise funds by recruiting supporters to run for their charity.

In that first year, just over £7,000 was raised for charity; by 2020, that figure had skyrocketed to over £66 million. To date, over £1 billion raised over its history.

How does the London Marathon help raise money charities?

Increase awareness & Brand recognition

There are a few key factors at play. First and foremost, the London Marathon is one of the most high-profile events in the world, with millions of people tuning in to watch the race on television and countless more lining the streets to cheer on the runners in person. This provides an opportunity for charities to increase awareness of their cause and reach a wider audience.

fundraising for charities

Fundraising support for charities

The obvious one, the London Marathon is the largest annual fundraising event in the world, providing a significant opportunity for charities to raise funds by recruiting supporters to run for their charity.

Boost charitable donations

Many runners choose to run the marathon in support of a charity, which provides a significant boost to fundraising efforts.

Credibility

The association with the London Marathon can help to increase the credibility of charities and enhance their reputation.

Charity marketing campaigns

The London Marathon offers the opportunity for something new to talk about to your supporters. Many charities have comprehensive marketing and communication plans in place to maximise engagement through digital technology including social media campaigns, website landing pages, email journeys and downloadable online resources.

Build key partnerships

The marathon provides an opportunity for charities to build relationships with corporate partners, sponsors, fundraisers and volunteers.

Funding for activities – A return on investment

For charities, the funds raised through the London Marathon can be used to support a wide range of charitable activities, including research, education, and advocacy.

Creating a community spirit

The event fosters a sense of community spirit, with supporters and volunteers coming together to help make a difference.

Lifelong supporters

The London Marathon can inspire people to get involved with charities and become lifelong supporters of their cause.

New to the for 2023: Trees Not Tees

Brand new for 2023, participants in the London Marathon have been offered the opportunity to opt out of receiving an official finisher’s T-shirt and have a tree planted instead.

My top 5 favourite celebrities running the London Marathon in 2023

1.         Chris Robshaw – Former England rugby captain

2.        Adele Roberts – Radio Presenter

3.        Marcus Mumford – Lead singer of Mumford & Sons

4.        Louise Minchin – Former BBC Breakfast Presenter

5.        Sophie Radworth – BBC News Presenter

The final stretch

All of this adds up to a truly remarkable impact. The London Marathon has helped countless charities to raise the funds they need to continue their vital work. From large, well-known charities like Cancer Research UK and Macmillan Cancer Support to smaller, grassroots organisations working in local communities, the London Marathon has been instrumental in supporting a vast array of causes over the years.

The route boasts a truly iconic course that showcases some of the city’s most famous landmarks, including Tower Bridge, the Cutty Sark, and Buckingham Palace.

The event has become known for its massive spectator support, with thousands of people lining the streets to cheer on the runners and create an incredible atmosphere of positivity and excitement.

The event is a prime example of how sport can be used as a force for good, as participants raise millions of pounds each year for a variety of charities. From global organisations to small, local initiatives, the funds raised through the London Marathon have helped to make a tangible impact in communities around the world.

In short, the London Marathon is much more than just a race. It is a symbol of unity, determination, and compassion. A shining example of how sport can be a powerful tool for positive change.

Whether you participate as a runner, show support as a spectator, or hold a firm belief in the potential of sports to create positive change. The London Marathon remains a powerful force for good with the potential to make a lasting impact.

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